5 Ways to Make Lone Workers Feel Safer on the Job

Do you have a plan in place to protect your lone workers? Even if your business seems like a safe environment, it can still be dangerous to be alone. The people who work for you should have knowledge about the dangers and risks of their job. It is your responsibility to help keep them safe in their line of work. This can include everything from safety training to workplace panic buttons.

Educate Your Employees on Potential Dangers

Lone workers face many dangers every day. These threats are part of their normal routine, and they should be aware of them. Discuss the different possibilities that could come up. Schedule training with your workers on how to react to these potential scenarios.

Accidents happen everywhere, and lone workers are more threatened by these than people in a traditional business setting. Isolation means there could be a delay in response time. People working by themselves also are more likely to be targeted for violence. Attackers are often bolder when they see someone on their own than when there’s a crowd.

Teach Employees How to Respond to Dangerous Situations

Employees should know how to assess their environment for potential dangers. It’s easy to become so involved in work that they forget to keep an eye out for problems. They should plan for the worst, so they can prevent a bad situation from escalating. This requires safety training, such as first aid and developing self-defense skills. They should also know how to diffuse a situation without violence.

Safety equipment, such as a workplace panic button, can come in handy. Other safety equipment could include bandages, a cellphone, and a fire extinguisher.

Monitor Your Employees Out in the Field

Knowing where your workers are and how they’re doing can help in a critical situation. You should always keep a clear log of your employee’s locations when they’re out in the field. Being aware of their most recent location can be important if they need help. Additionally, you should have your lone workers check in more regularly. If you set up a system of when they should check in, you can be aware of potential danger should they miss their check-in time. Additionally, they should always tell others where they’re going to be.

Follow Industry Safety Guidelines

Government regulations require every company to have safety guidelines. The Occupational Health and Safety Act (OSHA) covers all workers other than those who are self-employed or work in state and local governments. Some of these guidelines might seem unnecessary to an employee, but they’re there for a reason. They’re meant to protect employees from illnesses, injuries, and accidents.

Understanding these guidelines is a vital part of any job. It’s not enough to give your workers a paper with the guidelines; you must make sure they understand them and feel comfortable asking questions about them.

Have a Communication Plan in Place

For lone employees, the ability to easily communicate with others is a must. They should never go to work without having an efficient way to contact you. They should know what types of communications can be used and whether they’re applicable in every situation.

Tools like workplace panic buttons will allow your workers to quickly call for help. However, you should also have a way of contacting your lone workers. You need to be able to tell them if a schedule has changed, if an appointment gets canceled, or if the weather is closing down certain routes. In fact, you can use software to send routine and emergency alerts to your workers.

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